FI and Early Retirement… Could It All Come Crashing Down?

FI and Early Retirement… Could It All Come Crashing Down?

I’m not going to lie – being FI (financially independent) is a truly awesome feeling.  To realize that you don’t need to work again if you don’t want to takes such a massive weight off of your shoulders. But if you take it to the next level and throw in early retirement, you’re now solely depending on whatever you’ve put in place to sustain that financial independence. That’s scary.  No, I mean, that’s really scary. If you continue to work, you don’t share that risk until you actually decide to leave your job. But once you do, you better hope that your savings or income streams will cover you for the long haul.  If not, you could have a real problem.

Would You REALLY Work Out Once You’re Retired?

Would You REALLY Work Out Once You’re Retired?

I hate to work out. When talking to gym-addicts, they love to tell me things, “oh, you’ll learn to enjoy it over time.”  I chuckle. I don’t think so.  I hate knowing that it’s time to go work out and I hate the actual workout. “Yeah, but you feel so much better once you’re done, right?” Um, no.  I’m glad it’s over, but no, I don’t feel better or refreshed at all. Look, I’m just keeping it real.  I do it because it’s healthy and something I should be doing and that’s about it. And honestly, it was the first thing I’d always cut out of my day when in a time crunch… which happened a lot.  It’s all about

Make Your Money Work for You Instead of Vice Versa

Make Your Money Work for You Instead of Vice Versa

I think I first heard the mantra of “make your money work for you” when I was a kid.  I’d also guess that it was my grandfather who preached it.  He was able to retire in his mid-40’s before the term FIRE (financial independence / retire early) was even coined. But it took me years to really understand what that meant.  And even once I thought I got it, I still assumed it was just some pipe dream that only the rich could appreciate. Over the years though, I started to dig myself out of the credit card debt I was in.  Then I started saving.  And then I started saving even more and more. Eventually, I began to make

5 Life Lessons from Our First Year of Early Retirement

5 Life Lessons from Our First Year of Early Retirement

It’s time to share some life lessons I’ve gone through in my first year of early retirement. Exactly one year ago today, I was at the office on the last day I would ever work in my career again.  It was New Year’s Eve, 2018 and it was the day before my retirement officially began at the sweet age of 43. My career in IT started back in 1999 and lasted almost 20 years.  I started as an unexperienced Systems Engineer, but with training and experience, I became a confident engineer over the first handful of years.  Then in 2005, I was promoted to be the manager of the engineers, which I did for the remainder of my career. It’s

Uh-Oh… Our Retirement Expenses Are Higher than Expected

Uh-Oh… Our Retirement Expenses Are Higher than Expected

Retirement expenses are a tough one to plan for in life. You can budget for what you think your expenses will be, but you really don’t know if they’ll be more or less.  The biggest reason is that your life will likely be dramatically different at the time. This is probably even more on par the younger you are when you leave the workforce because you’re likely not going to be resting on your laurels.  Not only would you be trying your hand at all sorts of projects (some that cost money or transportation), but there’s a lot more time for changes to occur. And by changes, I mean that you have a longer amount of time for your likes

The What-Ifs of Moving to a Different Country

The What-Ifs of Moving to a Different Country

Recently, my friend Lisa from the Mad Money Monster blog wrote about the “what ifs” on moving to a different country.  It was appropriately titled The What Ifs of International Geoarbitrage And Early Retirement. There’s a lot of talk on the Internet, particularly in the personal finance community, about the idea of geoarbitrage.  That’s the strategy of moving to another location, domestic or abroad, to take advantage of the lower cost-of-living and move ahead financially or possibly retire early. It was a great post!  I love it because it raises a lot of questions that many people are thinking when they even consider geoarbitrage.  And she wasn’t trying to say whether or not moving to a different country is good